Campaign 2010

May 11, 2004

Senator Mark Dayton

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Transcript:

SEN. DAYTON:

My time is up, but I’m just going to complete here by just referring to one individual that said he was taken from a barber shop where he was getting a shave and he was beaten with pipes, starting at his legs and back and moving to his head. He was bleeding from his mouth and ears. He fainted. When he woke up, he was in a dog’s cage at a local military base. He was left naked in the cage for several days, receiving only scant food and water until soldiers hung him from a tree by his cuffed hands. “They told me they would bring my wife and hang her next to me.”

I don’t take any pleasure in recounting these incidents, but I take umbrage that there are still those who want to deny that they occurred to any degree or those that want to ascribe other motives to those of us who are just trying to face up to them.

I want the United States to succeed in Iraq. I’m deeply concerned that what’s occurred there is going to cause further violence that will come down on our troops, who will bear the brunt of this, and set back our ability to meet our objectives there. But I don’t see how that’s going to be served by trying to obscure or deny what’s occurring there or what has occurred there, and make sure—try to make sure it doesn’t happen again there or anywhere else in the world.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. My time is expired.

Entire Statement:

SEN. DAYTON: All right. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. If you were to go elsewhere—and thank goodness for a free and vigilant press, because I don’t think we would find most of this out any other way, but there’s a Red Cross report which describes excessive patterns of—patterns of excessive force used by U.S. soldiers in prisons, and not just the one subject to this investigation, but throughout the country.

The Red Cross wrote that ill treatment during capture was frequent. It often included pushing people around, insulting, taking aim with rifles, punching, kicking, striking which seemed to go beyond—seemed to reflect a usual modus operandi and appeared to go beyond the reasonable, legitimate, proportional use of force required to apprehend suspects or restrain persons resisting arrest or capture.

The published reports say that as many as 43,000 Iraqis were detained at various times, and that an estimated 90 percent of them were determined to have not had any involvement in the matters under—that were of concern to U.S. authorities; that only 600 were turned over to—for prosecution; that 8,000 that remain in detention now for indefinite periods of time, although I gather that there is now steps being taken to release all but 2,000 of them.

My time is up, but I’m just going to complete here by just referring to one individual that said he was taken from a barber shop where he was getting a shave and he was beaten with pipes, starting at his legs and back and moving to his head. He was bleeding from his mouth and ears. He fainted. When he woke up, he was in a dog’s cage at a local military base. He was left naked in the cage for several days, receiving only scant food and water until soldiers hung him from a tree by his cuffed hands. “They told me they would bring my wife and hang her next to me.”

I don’t take any pleasure in recounting these incidents, but I take umbrage that there are still those who want to deny that they occurred to any degree or those that want to ascribe other motives to those of us who are just trying to face up to them.

I want the United States to succeed in Iraq. I’m deeply concerned that what’s occurred there is going to cause further violence that will come down on our troops, who will bear the brunt of this, and set back our ability to meet our objectives there. But I don’t see how that’s going to be served by trying to obscure or deny what’s occurring there or what has occurred there, and make sure—try to make sure it doesn’t happen again there or anywhere else in the world.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. My time is expired.


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