Campaign 2010

Aug 21, 2006

Sekula-Gibbs Promises More of the Same if Elected

DCCC Press

Aug 21, 2006

Sekula-Gibbs Promises More of the Same if Elected

Just Like Republicans in Washington, Shelley Sekula-Gibbs Accepted a Pay Raise While on the Houston City Council During a City-Wide Financial Crisis

(Washington, D.C.) – Republicans in Washington are famous for accepting congressional pay raises even though the debt has reached $8.5 trillion under their watch while they continue to do nothing to balance the budget. Congressional candidate Shelley Sekula-Gibbs was one of five on the Houston City Council to accept a pay raise during a city-wide financial crisis in 2004. At the time, Houston faced an $8 million budget shortfall and projected gaps of more than $70 million for the following year.

Texas families deserve members of Congress who are fiscally responsible, and not simply looking out for their own pocketbook. Congress faces critical financial decisions every year, with the federal budget, the minimum wage and every other spending issue imaginable. By taking a pay raise while the city had money problems, Sekula-Gibbs not only showed she was not fiscally responsible to the families of Houston, she lacks the priorities necessary to make important decisions.

“Texas families have had enough of business as usual in Washington and yet Shelley Sekula-Gibbs is running for Congress on a record of the same misplaced priorities and fiscal recklessness,” said Bill Burton, communications director of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. “The fact that she took a pay raise when the city faced millions of dollars in shortfalls shows that she puts her interests ahead of family interests. It’s time for a new direction in Washington because Texans have had enough of politicians looking to make a buck.”

When Houston Was Facing A Financial Crisis, Sekula-Gibbs Accepted A Pay Raise. In 2004, Sekula-Gibbs was one of only five of fourteen City Council members to accept a pay raise, despite maintaining a private medical practice on the side. The Houston Chronicle reported that Houston “faces an anticipated $8 million shortfall this fiscal year, according to the controller's office. The gap for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, has been projected as high as $74 million by the finance and administration office.” Sekula-Gibbs declined to comment on acceptance of the 12% raise. [Houston Chronicle, 1/15/04, 1/16/04]