Campaign 2010

Feb 03, 2006

NEW WEB AD: Twisting in the Wind

DCCC Press

Feb 3, 2006

NEW WEB AD: Twisting in the Wind

Rob Simmons – An Unreliable Voice for Connecticut Families

With Rob Simmons on All Sides of Critical Issues Like Social Security and the Budget, he is Not an Independent, or Even Reliable Voice for Connecticut

Visit: http://www.dccc.org/video/final_simmons.wmv to Learn More

(Washington, D.C.) – Earlier this week, after buckling to political pressure, Rob Simmons voted against a special interest budget less than two months after voting for the same budget that puts the special interests first and American families last. Simmons vote in favor was the one that counted, as opposed to the procedural measure he supported for political gain. Simmons vote meant that investments in middle class essentials like student aid, relief from energy prices and a prescription drug program that actually works for seniors took a back seat to the special interest needs like a $14 billion giveaway to the oil companies.

This is not the first time that Simmons has changed his position on an important issue. On Social Security privatization, Simmons was for it before he again buckled to political pressure and switched positions. Simmons took a position that would have driven America deeper into debt and done nothing for the long-term solvency of Social Security. He abandoned that position only when it became politically unpopular.

"Rob Simmons has a history of sticking his finger in the political winds before taking a position and its long past time that Connecticut families had a member of Congress they could trust to look out for their interests every time, regardless of politics," said Bill Burton, communications director for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. "Connecticut families deserve better than a political weathervane when it comes to things as important as student aid, gas price relief, prescription drugs and Social Security. If Connecticut families can't trust Rob Simmons on matters of conscience like our commitment to Social Security and investments in our community, what can we trust him on?"

Rob Simmons Flipping and Flopping With Connecticut's Social Security

Flip: Simmons Supported Privatization Plan. In 2001, Simmons co-signed a letter to the President's Commission to Strengthen Social Security urging support for privatization. Simmons wrote to the Commission: "Social Security reform must offer younger workers the opportunity to improve their rates of return using personal retirement accounts." ["DeMint Letter" to The Social Security Reform Commission, 5/24/01]

Flop: Simmons Opposed Privatization Plan. "People are talking about reforming it," Simmons said last week. "We don't even have a plan. I have made it pretty clear I don't support privatizing Social Security." [New London Day, 1/13/05]

Rob Simmons Flipping and Flopping on the Budget

Flip: Simmons Voted Against $50 Billion Budget Cut Package. In November 2005, Simmons voted against final passage of a $49.9 billion budget cut package pushed by House conservatives under the guise of offsetting the costs associated with Hurricane Katrina. Billed as a deficit reduction measure, the "savings" in the package were found by cutting $14 billion from federal student aid, $4.9 billion from child support enforcement, more than $1 billion from agriculture support programs and increasing health care costs for low income children who rely on Medicaid. The bill also found $3.2 billion in "savings" by repealing a law that helps local employers compete with foreign trade violations. [HR 4241 , Vote #601, 11/18/2005; House Budget Committee Democrats, "Summary of House and Senate Reconciliation Bills," 11/22/05; Passed 217-215; R 217-14; D 0-200; I 0-1]

Flop: Simmons Voted For Final $40 Billion Budget Cut Bill. In December 2005, Simmons voted for the conference agreement to cut mandatory spending programs by $39.7 billion over the next five years. Due to the billions of dollars in tax cuts passed separately, the budget reconciliation package would increase the deficit. The measure cut nearly $13 billion from federal student loan programs, $7 billion from Medicaid that included increased cost-sharing and premiums for the poor, $1.5 billion from child support enforcement and $2.7 billion from initiatives that help the nation's farmers. The bill also repealed a program - known as the Byrd amendment - that helped local employers injured by unfair trade. The measure did not touch a $5 billion HMO slush fund established by the 2003 Medicare bill. [S 1932, Vote #670, 12/19/2005; House Budget Committee Minority Staff, "Key Provisions in the Conference Report on the Republican Spending Reconciliation Bill." 12/19/05; Passed 212-206; R 212-9; D 0-196; I 0-1]

Flip: Simmons Voted Against Final $40 Billion Budget Cut Bill. In February 2006, Simmons voted against the conference agreement to cut mandatory spending programs by $39.7 billion over the next five years. Due to the billions of dollars in tax cuts passed separately, the budget reconciliation package would increase the deficit. The measure cut nearly $13 billion from federal student loan programs, $7 billion from Medicaid that included increased cost-sharing and premiums for the poor, $1.5 billion from child support enforcement and $2.7 billion from initiatives that help the nation's farmers. The bill also repealed a program - known as the Byrd amendment - that helped local employers injured by unfair trade. The measure did not touch a $5 billion HMO slush fund established by the 2003 Medicare bill, and after intense lobbying from the health insurance industry, the budget saves HMOs $22 billion dollars. In January 2005, Simmons announced in a press statement that he would be opposing the final version of the Republican Budget cut package. [H. Res 653, Vote #4, 2/1/06; Simmons Press Release, 1/25/06]


Want the latest updates? Follow the DCCC on Facebook and Twitter: